Our Growing Past

Mike Edel - Victoria, BC - Musician - www.mikeedel.com

The Music Video for ‘The Closer’ is out today! 

It’s on YouTube and Vimeo, the link is in my profile. It was really great collaborating with @henriquebarone @brnemo #colinstewart #jobybaker @jordanc87 #jorge #cesar @armmotion @bri_annalee @japhyrider is a story that I am proud of and that I am glad to tell.

Mike Edel’s The Closer

Created by: Mike Edel, Jorge R. Canedo Estrada, Henrique Barone, Thanat Sattavorn, Cesar Martinez, Breno Licursi
Funded by: Public Records and Telus

Get ‘The Closer’ on iTunes: tinyurl.com/kr8sb7d
Get ‘The Closer’ + Mike Edel’s entire discography on Noisetrade: tinyurl.com/myrza9r

In Alberta, on the plains north of Calgary, the winters are long and cold they bite with big white teeth. These rural, simple and hardworking people sit patiently by their fires and wait for summer, a summer that is always short and hot.

When I was 6, I would jump into the backseat of my dad’s pickup truck as he would drive my brother, Jamie, all over the country to his baseball games. I loved baseball. I loved baseball almost as much as them. I would stand beside my friend Ryan and we would watch the game and watch our brothers and look through the chain link fence with our young keen eyes. We saw the balls, the strikes, the out’s and the coach’s walk to mound; but what we waited for was the foul balls.

If a foul ball flew over the fence, Ryan and I would sprint like outfielders to track it down in a race that was always even because we both got our fair share of foul balls as far as I can remember. With the ball in one of our gloves, we would saunter over to a little white shack that always needed a paint job and the old Mrs. Claus looking lady at the concession stand would hold out her big soft hand and we place the ball into it like we were at a carnival. With her other hand she handed us a quarter. We would hand it straight back to her for 2 licorice’s and chew them all the way back to the chain link fence. I loved baseball.

My dad also loved baseball. He would be the guy that sat on the bleachers holding one of those baseball scorebooks, the one with the coils all down one side and with a thousand little baseball diamond pictures inside where he would translate the game into this picture language. He must be really good at remember pictures because he would keep the score in this book game after game, and there were lots of them, and now at 67 years old he still remembers all these plays in the baseball game. My brother hit a triple down the right field line to drive in 3 with the bases loaded in Oyen to win a Provincial game. Another time, with runners on first and second Jamie caught a line drive, stepped on second and overthrew the neighbor kid (Shawn Gorr) at first only to cover the bag and get all 3 outs by himself.

My dad remembers this.

I wrote a song called The Closer. It’s a story about a pitcher in a small town, a lot like the one I grew up in, who is pitching a perfect game into the 9th inning. But his mom runs onto the mound and tells him that he needs to leave the game because his dad has had a farming accident. So the coach brings in the closer with a 2-0 lead in the 9th inning. He gives up a walk. Then a single. Then a home-run. They lose the game 3-2 in the 9th.

I think that sometimes we think that these small moments in small towns don’t matter, but the truth is that they do.

The baseball diamonds, and the hockey rinks and the community centers are the theaters where life takes place for these people. They are the stages that hold the metaphors for the joys and the tragedy’s of simple life. Everybody comes in the heat of a short summer and sits there, cheering and groaning and feeling joy and heartbreak together. And they all love baseball.

mikeedel.com
instagram.com/mikeedel
twitter.com/mikeedelmusic
facebook.com/thelastofourmountains
jrcanest.co
henriquebarone.com
behance.net/eldiablo 
armmotion.com
instagram.com/brnemo

My new song “The Closer” + my entire discography is available on Noisetrade this week for a tip or for free.


I am giving 100% of the proceeds from this download to Boyle Heights Younglife to run their program in the upcoming year. They will use this money to go to a L.A. Dodgers game and eat overpriced hot Hot Dogs, to drive a van with 15 people in it to a gas station where they will put gas in it, they will use it to go to Taco Tuesday’s at the taqueria down the street, and they are going to go rent bowling shoes and throw bowling balls in a bowling alley together. Our Goal is $1000.


I met this group of 5 college-age leaders and 10 kids at a place called Woodleaf Younglife Camp in Northern California this summer. They were all wearing Dodgers hats and sitting under tree and I instantly felt that they were one of the warmest groups of Dodgers fans I had ever met. I learned that Boyle Heights is not an easy neighborhood to live in, it’s east LA after all. Wil. i. am. grew up there, and so did Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Ricky Romero, it’s a place where it’s not easy to be a kid, it’s the home of Roosevelt High School, the second largest high school in the U.S.A. I could tell my Boyle Heights crew (Bailey, Greg, Ethan, Charlie, Chantelle, Ashley, Victor, Victor’s sister, Yudi, Ari, Brian, Nestor, Jesus, Steven & Ilvia) was living life together, and trying to live it well. And I want to help them and I want to be a part of it.
@woodleaftowne @ylgreaterla @heybails08 @edubois21 @queen_esli @gregsandman @flatxbush @mokey_official @nene__doee

My new song “The Closer” + my entire discography is available on Noisetrade this week for a tip or for free.


I am giving 100% of the proceeds from this download to Boyle Heights Younglife to run their program in the upcoming year. They will use this money to go to a L.A. Dodgers game and eat overpriced hot Hot Dogs, to drive a van with 15 people in it to a gas station where they will put gas in it, they will use it to go to Taco Tuesday’s at the taqueria down the street, and they are going to go rent bowling shoes and throw bowling balls in a bowling alley together. Our Goal is $1000.


I met this group of 5 college-age leaders and 10 kids at a place called Woodleaf Younglife Camp in Northern California this summer. They were all wearing Dodgers hats and sitting under tree and I instantly felt that they were one of the warmest groups of Dodgers fans I had ever met. I learned that Boyle Heights is not an easy neighborhood to live in, it’s east LA after all. Wil. i. am. grew up there, and so did Toronto Blue Jays pitcher Ricky Romero, it’s a place where it’s not easy to be a kid, it’s the home of Roosevelt High School, the second largest high school in the U.S.A. I could tell my Boyle Heights crew (Bailey, Greg, Ethan, Charlie, Chantelle, Ashley, Victor, Victor’s sister, Yudi, Ari, Brian, Nestor, Jesus, Steven & Ilvia) was living life together, and trying to live it well. And I want to help them and I want to be a part of it.
@woodleaftowne @ylgreaterla @heybails08 @edubois21 @queen_esli @gregsandman @flatxbush @mokey_official @nene__doee

When I was 6 I used to go to my brothers baseball games and run after all the foul balls. This is my brother, #9 on the right, and his team after winning one if those games.


My song The Closer is on iTunes today! Go get it if you like:) ⚾️


I found this picture when I was digging around my parents house, looking for photos for their 40th anniversary slideshow. I had been telling these story’s of my brothers baseball games and of my dad sitting on the bleachers keeping score and of me trading foul balls for licorice, and this is almost exactly how I remembered it; Nick Wiens’ glasses and all.

I am excited to share this new song, about baseball, called The Closer.

In Alberta, on the plains north of Calgary, the winters are long and cold they bite with big white teeth.  These rural, simple and hardworking people sit patiently by their fires and wait for summer, a summer that is always short and hot. 

When I was 6, I would jump into the backseat of my dad’s pickup truck as he would drive my brother, Jamie, all over the country to his baseball games.  I loved baseball.  I loved baseball almost as much as them.  I would stand beside my friend Ryan and we would watch the game and watch our brothers and look through the chain link fence with our young keen eyes.  We saw the balls, the strikes, the out’s and the coach’s walk to mound; but what we waited for was the foul balls.  

If a foul ball flew over the fence, Ryan and I would sprint like outfielders to track it down in a race that was always even because we both got our fair share of foul balls as far as I can remember.  With the ball in one of our gloves, we would saunter over to a little white shack that always needed a paint job and the old Mrs. Claus looking lady at the concession stand would hold out her big soft hand and we place the ball into it like we were at a carnival.  With her other hand she handed us a quarter.  We would hand it straight back to her for 2 licorice’s and chew them all the way back to the chain link fence.  I loved baseball.

My dad also loved baseball. He would be the guy that sat on the bleachers holding one of those baseball scorebooks, the one with the coils all down one side and with a thousand little baseball diamond pictures inside where he would translate the game into this picture language. He must be really good at remember pictures because he would keep the score in this book game after game, and there were lots of them, and now at 67 years old he still remembers all these plays in the baseball game.  My brother hit a triple down the right field line to drive in 3 with the bases loaded in Oyen to win a Provincial game. Another time, with runners on first and second Jamie caught a line drive, stepped on second and overthrew the neighbor kid (Shawn Gorr) at first only to cover the bag and get all 3 outs by himself. 

My dad remembers this.

I wrote a song called The Closer. It’s a story about a pitcher in a small town, a lot like the one I grew up in, who is pitching a perfect game into the 9th inning.  But his mom runs onto the mound and tells him that he needs to leave the game because his dad has had a farming accident. So the coach brings in the closer with a 2-0 lead in the 9th inning.  He gives up a walk.  Then a single.  Then a home-run.  They lose the game 3-2 in the 9th. 

I think that sometimes we think that these small moments in small towns don’t matter, but the truth is that they do. 

The baseball diamonds, and the hockey rinks and the community centers are the theaters where life takes place for these people.  They are the stages that hold the metaphors for the joys and the tragedy’s of simple life.  Everybody comes in the heat of a short summer and sits there, cheering and groaning and feeling joy and heartbreak together.  And they all love baseball.

Mike